Posted August 30th, 2017

A reminder to all Friends of the first night Bar Receptions until mid-September 2017.

Remember, as a Friend, you qualify for a 25% discount on tickets for these nights and the receptions offer a great opportunity to meet the cast in the informal setting of the bar – and perhaps have your photo taken with one of your favourite actors!

Click on any of the images below for more information about the production on the Eastbourne Theatres’ website. 

Dates below are for the
Bar Receptions
 

The Ghost’s Touch

Tuesday 26 September 

starring
Mark Homer &
Terri Dwyer

 


Private Lives

Tuesday 10 October 


Mind Game

Tuesday 24 October 


Million Dollar Quartet

Monday 30 October 


 

Dick Wittington

Tuesday 12 December

PLEASE NOTE
THIS WILL BE HELD IN
THE BUCCANEER 

We are sorry, but these Receptions are only open to members of the Friends of the Devonshire Park Theatre.  Please see the Membership page of this website for details of how to join.

The Friends always look forward to meeting the cast and company of a Talking Scarlet production and this was certainly true of those assembled in the bar following the opening night of Body Double.  Over the years we have got used to summer ‘murder’ plays and this play written by Mark Carey and first performed in 2016 – while not having ‘murder’ in the title – was indeed another from that genre that would have you settle into your seat – or perch on the edge of it – and enjoy!

Body Double is a play within a play. The actors are actors, the set a set and – as we quickly learn – the play being rehearsed mirrors the life of those rehearsing it.  The whole play revolves around the concept of the body double – that is an actor who appears briefly on stage to cover for another who is making a quick change.  The audience watch the double believing them to be the main actor and then the lead appears again as someone else!

As the large first night audience watched this latest offering from Pat Kearns and his Talking Scarlet team – with all but one of the actors familiar faces at the DPT, they were busy concentrating on the many twists and turns of the plot and those Friends who were looking forward to meeting those on stage in the bar afterwards had no inkling of the sobering news that was to be imparted to them later that evening.

Talking Scarlet has a good following amongst those Friends who regularly attend the first night bar receptions and indeed this was the case on this warm early August evening.  It was so good to see our Patron, John Hester, so often associated with Talking Scarlet and Philip Stewart who was directing the play as well as Pat and his five-strong cast.

Clockwise from top left: Davis Palmer, Ross Waiton, Philip Stewart, Katy Dean, Freya Copeland, Patric Kearns, Marcus Hutton

We are all grateful to the very emotional Patric for taking the opportunity to share the devastating news about the future of his company.  We all know that theatre is an industry of precarious finances but it is indeed sobering when difficulties hit so close to home.  For many, Talking Scarlet are part of the DPT family and collectively we wish Patric and all the many actors who have appeared in his productions and whom we have got to know and love over the years all the very best for the future, whatever it brings!

Posted July 4th, 2017

This clever play by Richard Bean, adapted from the original commedia dell’arte play by Carlo Goldoni, is the epitome of comic theatre – and perhaps a bit like marmite, you either love it or hate it!  That was certainly the mixed view of the Friends who gathered in the theatre bar after watching the play in a packed auditorium on Friends’ night.  But what a brilliant choice for a fun summer production it turned out to be. With Chris Jordan at the helm, perhaps a little reminder of what we have in store in panto season!

Chris and Talking Scarlet had assembled such a talented cast of actor-musicians it would be difficult to single out particular individuals, although special mention has to be made of Aiden O’Neill who brought his own take on Francis Henshall, the character made so famous at the National Theatre by James Corden and then there was poor Peter Lovstrom – regularly seen recently on the DPT stage – as the hapless servant Alfie who was to take many a tumble into the orchestra pit!  So good too to see Patric Kearns – clean shaven with short back and sides – as the wheeler-dealer Charlie Clench!

The skiffle group formed from this gifted cast and company was inspirational.  They regaled the audience during the scene changes with music that – all bar one piece we were told – dated to the year 1963.  A real visit down memory lane for so many in the audience. This may have lengthened what was already a marathon, but worth every moment for entertainment value!

There was a little nervousness amongst the Friends waiting in a bar packed to capacity to meet the cast, but It was such a delight to meet and chat to them all.

Posted June 13th, 2017

There must be a reason why Trespass has not been staged for seventy years, despite it being a play from the pen of outstanding playwright, Emlyn Williams – who has such works as Night Must Fall and The Grass is Green to his name.  Perhaps the audience at the DPT on the first night of this Talking Scarlet production found out why!

This ghost story, written in 1947 – a post-war period when the country was coming to terms with bereavement on an enormous scale – deals with the shady area between life and death when minor aristocrat, Christine (played by our lovely Michelle Morris) is struggling to come to terms with the death of her second husband and is seeking a way of communicating with him.  Into her life walks – or rather arrives by boat for the ancestral home is on a remote island (remind you of a Christie story?) – a pair of charlatans posing as mediums – or is one of them for real?  With some tremendous acting performances and excellent mood changing lighting and music (what more would one expect from a play directed by Patric Kearns) it is good – if at times somewhat slow – entertainment.

Back: Jeremy Lloyd-Thomas, Ian Crowe, Jason Marc-Williams
Front: David Callister, Michelle Morris, Katy Dean, Judy Buxton

It was with mixed feelings that the Friends waited in the theatre bar to welcome the cast after this first night performance but with so many old friends among the cast any uneasiness was quickly dispelled and the conversation flowed.  It was so lovely to see them all back again at the DPT and we are always so grateful for the time that they give to us.  We look forward to welcoming many of them back later in the year.

“On the edge of our seats” doesn’t adequately describe the roller-coaster of thrills and plot twists in Kiss of Death, by Simon Williams – a writer with a remarkable list of credits from Spooks, Sense & Sensibility and Dr Who!

Another gripping drama brought to the DPT stage by Talking Scarlet with their Artistic Director, Patric Kearns at the helm.  The four strong cast, including father and daughter David and Ciara Janson, aided by outstanding technical support from the backstage crew, gave powerful performances for this quietly sinister play.

Back row: Davies Palmer, David Janson & Peter Lovstrom with Ciara Janson in front centre.

It is always such a treat to welcome Patric and his Talking Scarlet company to the bar following their first night.

It is always with eager anticipation that a DPT audience awaits the start of a production from Creative Cow – for they always live up to their name.  This time is was with a clever adaptation by our Patron, the multi-talented Clive Francis, of the Graham Greene novel Our Man in Havana.  Again, it was a good sized audience that awaited the start of the play on its opening night and they were not to be disappointed as the cast of four took on the twenty-something roles plus narrator in this amusing and often tense drama.  Confusing?  Not at all – and certainly no repeat of last year’s production of Travels with my Aunt.

This time, the clever use of narration brought the audience – if there was any doubt – back into line and the actors have to be hugely commended on their performances.  At this stage, perhaps an apology to the cast might be in order.  On an unseasonably hot evening, the efficient new heating system in the theatre was working at its best – replicating the near-tropical climatic conditions of Cuba lending a certain unwelcome authenticity to the proceedings.  Particularly affected was poor Charles Davies (last seen at the DPT in our in-house production of Ayckbourn’s Round and Round the Garden in 2015) who was on stage for much of the play in his role as the vacuum cleaner salesman cum would-be spy, Wormold.

From Left: Charles Davies, James Dinsmore, Michael Onslow & Isla Carter

It is always such a pleasure to welcome Director, Amanda Knott, and her cast and members of the company to a bar reception and this was no exception.  It was a joy to meet and chat to them all and we send our best wishes as they continue their tour with this excellent play and hope to see them back at the DPT sometime soon.

 

Winner of the Oliver Award for best new comedy in 2015 and still going strong, what a phenomenon The Play that Goes Wrong has become not only in the West End and on Broadway, but with tours across the UK and Europe – and indeed the world, for we learnt that at least one member of the crew was about to leave for Japan and New Zealand with the show.

Slapstick it is, entertaining it remains but what a clever production from a talented cast of young actors. Many booking for the run in Eastbourne had seen the show before, but that clearly did not spoil their enjoyment of this fast-moving and hilariously funny play.  It was a packed house – even up in the Gods – for their opening night at the DPT a situation that was to be repeated until the end of their run.  Rarely – outside of panto – does the DPT ring with so much laughter.

What a pleasure it was to welcome this hard working cast for a really well earned drink after their on-stage exploits.  The Friends wish them every success with the remainder of their tour.  We hope they keep safe!

Judging by the laughter that started the moment the curtain rose and continued until the end, many in the audience for Waiting for God’s first night in Eastbourne  were fondly recalling the antics at the Bayview Retirement Home they had enjoyed in front of their TVs during several BBC TV series in the 1990s. The sitcom has been adapted for the stage by its creator, Michael Aitkens, and brought bang up to date for 2017.   All the favourite characters are still there – the main protagonists, Diana and Tom – played by two brilliant comedy actors, Nichola McAuliffe and Jeffrey Holland  –  and the cringingly awful, Harvey Baines with love-struck Jane fawning over him, head a really talented cast in this fast-paced comedy.

It was an evening packed full of laughter and humour: one of pure entertainment and enjoyment.  What was there not to like?

clockwise from top left:
Emily Pithon, Joanna Bending, David Benson, Jeffrey Holland, Peter Cadden,
Samuel Collins, Corinna Marlowe

It was with real pleasure that the Friends welcomed the cast, the writer/creator and some of the company to the bar for drink after the show.  Sadly, Nichola was unable to join us as she had to return home that evening but it was so lovely to see so many old friends and make some new.

 

It was especially good to see our good friends Jeffrey Holland and his wife Judy Buxton.  Judy had just started rehearsals for Trespass, the Emlyn Hughes ghost story – which comes to the DPT in mid-June and we also learned that Jeffrey will be back in Brassed Off with Talking Scarlet in September.  We can’t wait!

It is amazing how even the best part of seventy-five years on, the thought of the Nazi-occupied Channel Islands in 1943 can bring a chill.  German-occupied Guernsey was the setting for this wonderful play written by Moira Buffini in 1997 and for which she drew her inspiration from actual accounts of life on the island at that time. She focuses on the sensitive relationships between the local women and the occupying German officers.  It was a time of pure terror, hardship and food shortages and it is a good feeling to think that the desperate – yet feisty –  women in this play were typical of those living what must have been totally terrifying ordeal with a future (if they had one) full of uncertainty.

It was a capacity audience that waited in anticipation of the house lights going down in front of an amazing raised set of a somewhat austere Guernsey farmhouse – which, we were to learn afterwards from the producer, had all manner of significance and symbolism.  Perhaps – as we were also to hear – not so good for those sitting in the front rows of the stalls, though!

This well cast and superbly acted play was full of drama, suspense with some brilliantly timed humour thrown into the mix.  The two hours went amazingly quickly and it was unsurprising that the bar was packed with Friends waiting eagerly to welcome this wonderful cast and members of the company.

The Cast. (clockwise from top left): Paul McGann, Sarah Schoenbeck,
Venice van Someren, Belinda Lang, Jules Melvin, Robin Morrisey

For the majority, it was their first visit to the Eastbourne stage – and for Paul McGann the first time he had taken a play on tour.  It was a joy to welcome them all and we are grateful for their willingness to chat, share their thoughts and allow more than the usual number of selfies!  The party went on for some time – as the pictures below bear witness.

 

 

So, who was was Gabriel?  An RAF pilot, an SS interrogator, a local boy with amnesia or perhaps a saviour sent from heaven?  No spoilers here, but perhaps we will never know!

We have been very lucky this year with some (if not most) of the productions on offer at the DPT and we must all give Chris Jordan a huge vote of thanks for bringing yet another top quality play for us to enjoy.  More of the same, please, Chris!

For many in the packed house at the DPT for the first night of Abigail’s Party, it was frightening to think that it is indeed forty years since Mike Leigh’s iconic play was first performed.  The set before them was perhaps so reminiscent of the homes they knew all those years ago.  The room divider – complete with drinks cabinet –  the shag pile carpet, the vinyl records, the cheese and pineapple on sticks stuck into a foil covered orange, not to mention the plentiful supply of alcohol!

It is a period piece now – but so beautifully performed by the five-strong cast led by Amanda Abbington as the appalling hostess, Beverley!  The audience were enthralled and appalled in equal measure as the drinks party from hell degenerates into total chaos, the drama intensifies and the comedy becomes tragedy – ending on a note of total farce!  A heady mixture which, despite those oh so cringing moments, stands the test of time.  So convincing had the performance been, it led one Friend to ask a cast member if there had been much improvisation, “definitely not” came the reply with some mutterings about how unhappy that would have made Mike Leigh!  Not to mention the technical difficulties the stage management would have encountered in synchronising Demis Roussos!

The Cast: clockwise from top left: Ben Caplan, Amanda Abbington, Ciaran Owens, Rose Keegan and Charlotte Mills

It was a very enthusiastic group of Friends who gathered in the bar in anticipation of meeting Beverley, Laurence, Angela, Tony and Susan – aka Amanda, Ben, Charlotte, Ciarán and Rose!  It was an absolute joy to chat to such a friendly group of actors who gave very freely of their time.  This particular party went on for some time.

We wish them well for the remainder of their UK tour and hope to see them all back at the DPT soon!